Word Usage

punch a clock

I came across this phrase in th following context:I wish I could punch a clock and leave work behind. Is it some kind of an idiom?

to make a final no-hold-barre

to make a final no-hold-barred attempt

I am interested to know what is 'no-hold-barred'?

no HOLES barred

I think it's a "no HOLES barred" expression which is used to describe a way of behaviour without paying attention to restrictions ("a no holes barred campaign" is the one in which both sides used lies, insulted each other, etc)

Thanks, Fenya!

So it's actually a misprint and i've been raking my brains about this!

Nice to have you here!

punch a clock and leave work behind

Workers in a factory must CLOCK IN/ON when they arrive and CLOCK OUT/OFF when they leave These times are recorded by an automatic CLOCKING-IN machine (you have to put a card into it, in other words TO PUNCH THE/A CLOCK. In the example sentence "After 17 years of punching the clock, he just disappeared one morning and was never heard from again." given in CALD at http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=64174&dict=CALD
I think it's very close to the Russian idiomatic phrase "ОТТРУБ

Just as a note, areas of work

Just as a note, areas of work other than factories where the staff is paid by the hour also have time clocks where one must punch in and out.

As I see it 'punch a clock' i

As I see it 'punch a clock' in this context means 'close books on; write the final chapter in' - stop working and leave work behind. Probably '17 years of punching a clock' also implies the monotonous routine of punching in/out for years, not only 'toiling or labouring.'

punch a clock I came across

punch a clock
I came across this phrase in th following context:I wish I could punch a clock and leave work behind. Is it some kind of an idiom?

At some places of employment workers have punching cards, where an automatic clock punches the time of arrival and the time of departure of each worker. A worker is paid according to the information on his/her card. It is called hourly wages.

Probably it is too early to leave, but this person really wants to go home.

"no holds barred" found

No holds barred (= without any rules or constraints, especially those of fair play)

(From all-in wrestling of the most primitive kind, in which no hold or grip or indeed any method of dealing with an opponent was forbidden.)

I'd translate this

as 'не гнушаться ничем' 'отчаянная попытка'

That would suggest 'All is fair in war and love' (=В любви и на войне все средства хороши). Probably the modified saying would run as follows: 'In war and love there're no holes barred'. Sorry for my feeble attempt at rephrasing.